Gibson potentiometer dating

gibson potentiometer dating

Are all Gibson potentiometers the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same. Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson.

How do you date a potentiometer on a guitar?

Pot dates can be a useful tool in dating guitars. But remember this is the date that the potentiometer was produced. Pots in an older guitar may have been replaced, and this should be considered, especially if the date suggested does not fit with other features of the guitar.

Who made potentiometers in the 60s and 70s?

Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson. Pots usually have several identification numbers. One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number.

What do the numbers on a Gibson pot code mean?

One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year]. For more information on Gibson pot codes (and others), see Reading Pot Codes

Who made Gibson potentiometers in the 60s?

Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson. Pots usually have several identification numbers.

Are all Gibson pots the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same.

How is a potentiometer used in a guitar circuit?

A potentiometer can be used in one of two ways – as a voltage divider (fig 1) or as a variable resistor (aka rheostat – fig 2). Potentiometers in guitar circuits are used to control volume and tone. For volume applications, they are configured as voltage dividers and for tone they are wired as variable resistors.

What do the numbers on a Gibson pot code mean?

One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year]. For more information on Gibson pot codes (and others), see Reading Pot Codes

What pot code does Gibson use?

The basic companies Gibson used were IRC ,CTS , Central Lab. IRC used (615) code to begin the sequence of numbers on the pot case . Central Lab used ( 134 )and CTS used (137) codes. The way to ready a pot code is as follows .

When does Gibson go to 9 digit serial numbers?

NOTE - Gibson USA goes to a 9 digit serial number in early July 2005.. The sixth number is now a batch number- batch 0 starts at the beginning of the day, and once we stamp 699, the batch number will change to 1. The first 5 numbers remain the same, the last 3 numbers will remain the same.

What do the numbers on a parts number on a pot mean?

Pots usually have several identification numbers. One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year].

What are pot codes and how do you date a guitar?

If youve been reading articles about dating a vintage guitar, you may well have come across mention of pot codes, and the concept of using pot codes to date your guitar. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone.

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